About your Search

20130822
20130830
STATION
CSPAN 14
MSNBCW 10
CSPAN2 7
KQED (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 47
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cover poverty, to cover race, to go deeper and find the real story. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we would rather be here. >> will be on line. >> look at it and see the people that came to the march. these are ordinary men and women dressed like they are going to church and they believe they are going to church. >> i think that the world came together around an idea that all men, and we soon added women and children, gay lesbian and children are created equal so it cr
-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." you can follow me on facebook and @ed show, all that good stuff in the social media. we love hearing from viewers. tonight in our ask ed live segment, the question comes from cordel garrett, do you think some on the right are itching for a race war in this country? god for bid. talk about transparency. our producers put that question up. i think we in the media have a responsibility to tone things down when it gets hot. if you know what i mean. no, i don't think there's going to be a race war in america. and i don't think there are some when you say some on the right, i mean, three, four, ten, thousands, whatever? i'm trying to answer this as directly as i can. i don't think there's going to be a race war in america nor would i ever advocate that. but i think that conservatives will do just a
learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am proud to say that i october of 2010, this effort led to 190 countries signing onto an historic agreement to improve aviation security, standards, and technology and information sharing. i have had the chance to visit many of those countries over the past 4.5 years. continentscross six -- however, our work did not end there. following the 20 10 air cargo threat which involved bombs hidden inside printer cartridges departing on international planes to the united states, we launched a second initiative to work with intern
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. [ male announcer ] over the last 100 years, tennis has gotten a lot less dainty, rackets less splintery, courts more surfacey. technology made the game a whole lot faster and awesomer. it's kind of like how esurance used technology to build a car insurance company for the modern world. advantage, you. let's give it up for the modern world. [ crowd cheering ] [ male announcer ] or...that works. esurance. proud sponsor of the u.s. open. check out esurance on facebook. >>> i walked through that door, dr. king said, oh, you're the boy from troy. are you john louis? and i said dr. king, i am john robert louis. so from that moment on he started calling me the boy from troy. >> john robert louis was 23 years old when he spoke at the lincoln memorial 50 years ago today. at that moment, congressman louis recalled how he felt that day and what the march on washington meant for american history. >> this is all of us
, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers that don't own a tablet. to give you a rough example, apple -- which leads in the tablet market -- has sold somewhere around 160 million ipads since 2010. that's a remarkable achievement and for people that own appl
1963 the economy has changed. the twin forces of technology and global competition have sub tract those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class. reduced the bargaining power of american workers. and our politics have suffered, entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust statusco, resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal. parceling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum-wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy without could afford it just to fund crumbling schools, that all these things violated sound economic principleses. we would be told that growing inequality was the price for a growing economy. a measure of a free market. that greed was good and compassion ineffective. that those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. and then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle class americans of a great untruth. that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic in
280 square miles charred so far, firefighters are using new technology to survey the damage. drones like this one identify hot spots as fire reshapes the landscape, giving this region a new look and new worries. tonight this fire has destroyed some 31 homes. it threatens 4,500 structures, it is just over 20% contained. lester? >> all right, miguel. thanks for the update from there. >>> up next, as we continue from the nation's capital, where are the worst drivers on the american road? there's a new list out tonight. >>> looks like a star is born after a giant upset by an american teenager at the u.s. open. 17-year-old victoria duvall ranked 296th in the world shocked former u.s. open champion samantha stosur in the first round last night under the lights of arthur asch stadium in new york. duval plays her next match tomorrow but later today talked to nbc news about her big win. see the interview tomorrow morning on "today." >>> though a lot of folks would beg to differ, a new report says washington, d.c. has the worst drivers of any big city in america. the nation's capital takes th
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. >>> in the spotlight tonight, the crisis in syria, president obama says he has not made a decision yet on whether he will order military action in syria, but made the case for a limited strike during an interview with pbs's news hour today. >> when you start to talk about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons anywhere, over time their control over the chemical weapons may er ode, where they're known terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states in the past. then there is a prospect, a possibility in which chemical weapons can have devastating effects could be directed at us. and we want to make sure that that does not happen. and
your kids to do well in school. >> i am mostly struck by how different things are now. the technology is such that you can get it -- mob to show up and dance in the middle of pennsylvania avenue if you wanted but to get 253,000 people against the mall, there would be old horns, pulpits, it was remarkable and to me, i would like for young people to understand the enormity of what it took to do that. >> and a very short time, a group of people came together because they believed in something and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> for the legacy on the march in washington to go or word, to the young people who want to be see thatts, to really they have an obligation to cover poverty, cover race, go deeper to find the real story. >> julian. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we have to be here. >> but it will be online. [laughter] the march,came to ordinary men and women dressed like they're going to church because many believe they were going to church. >> andrew. >> the world came together around an idea that all
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
question? caller: if president garfield had been shot in our modern times with our technology, do you think he would have been saved? guest: i would just venture a guess to say yes. the simple removal of a bullet, he would be able to detect where it was in the system. host: arthur may have been severely depressed by the loss of his wife, but they entertained lavishly in the white house and he undertook an amazing redecoration of the white house that was done by louis tiffany. if you think of a tiffany lamp with all the colors, think about that in the white house. what did it look like when it was done? >> the elephant in the room, the thing you could not ignore, was this wall of tiffany glass. it was put up in what is the main hall, the central hall of the state for. -- floor. you come in from the main entrance, the north entrance of the white house into technically the lobby, the entrance, and today you see white columns and it opens up and the doors to the blue room immediately, the red room, the green room, but in those days the draft was so bad and people were complaining, he put up thi
. some lead in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, invest in our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. finally, and the second-class citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents.♪ >> our next two speakers, professor charles ogletree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia campos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african- american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. i want to support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, d
this postponement they say is due to technology. we all are familiar now with the debt clock. there is also the cost. if they implement any parts and they don't work it could cost even more. how does the president develop a strategy that actually gets this plan to move past all of this? >> the key real date that matter, jamie, is january 1st. that is when all the policies or actual insurance policies, health insurance policies would go into effect. , what you're seeing today, today's revelation isn't all that great. it doesn't, what they're talking about doing is delaying these exchanges going into the marketplace, oregon already said it would do that. move it from october first to october 15th. the administration promised everything would start on time but we're talking about 20% of the nation's economy being altered here by this law. whether the marketplace exchanges go into, into place october 1st or october 12th doesn't really matter. what matters is that the marketplace opens up sometime in october and that the policies go into effect on january 1st. and at that point i do agree, at some point
's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. she was a picky eater. well now i'm her dietitian... ...and last year, she wasn't eating so well. so i recommended boost complete nutritional drink to help her get the nutrition she was missing. and now she drinks it every day. well, it tastes great! [ male announcer ] boost drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones, and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. and now boost comes in two delicious, new bars. look for them next to boost drinks. [ dietitian ] now, nothing keeps mom from doing what she loves... ...being my mom. new kellogg's raisin bran® with omega 3 from flax seeds. plus plump juicy raisins. flax seed? who are you? i still got it. [ male announcer ] invest in your heart health with kellogg's raisin bran® cereals. when she's happy, she writes about bunnies. when she's sad, she writes about goblins. [ balloon pops, goblin growling ] she wrote a lot about goblins after getting burne
and technology and infrastructure, our borders are now better staffed and better protected than at any time in our nations history. it illegal crossings have dropped to 40-year lows. we also set commonsense immigration priorities with a focus on criminals, national security and public safety threats, repeat offenders, and egregious emigration file leaders. last year, we remote more serious criminals from the united states than at any time in our history. we strengthened our work to combat transnational criminal organizations including those that commit cyber crime and financial fraud, violate international property and prey upon human life. as part of our effort, we established the dhs loop campaign to unify the departments work to fight the worldwide scourge of human trafficking. while important, we still need to make sure that future changes we needed to make further changes to create a more flexible, fair, and focused emigration system. we instructed our immigration agents and officers to use their discretion under current law to not pursue low priority immigration cases. like children b
of technology and the george washington university. to my far right, again, only in geography, andrew young. he was a close aide to dr. martin luther king. he helped organize the march on washington. he was a former congressman, mayor of atlanta, and ambassador to the united nations. he is currently a professor at the andrew young school of policy studies at your estate university. to my left, gwen ifill, reporter and managing editor of pbs's washington week. she has covered seven presidential campaigns, moderated two vice presidential debates. before that, she worked for nbc, the new york times, and the washington post. in this business, she is regarded as one of the best. to my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement while a student at morehouse college. he helped found the student nonviolent coordinating committee. in 1998, he was elected chairman of the naacp, the national association for the advancement of colored people. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television commentator and is currently a professor at both ameri
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportunit jeervemake no mistake, presidene accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons. >> from secretary of state john kerry, a warning, there is no doubt that it happened. >> the indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, killing of women and children and innocent bystander is a moral on sen tir. for five days syria refused to let the u.n instead it attacked the area further, shelling it and systematically are destroying evidence. that is not the behavior of a vernment that has nothing to h
. but recent advances in technological, if you have a cool $100,000 in your back pocket then you may be able to take a trip that's literally out of this world. >> space, the final holiday frontier. the place of many childhood dreams may now be within reach. who corporations, virgin galactic and space exploration operation are scheduled to begin flights within 12 months. packages are expected to start at around $100,000. >> our aim ask to make space affordable to everyone. so we would like to also get people that who may have dreams when they are young to want to go to space. they will be also our type clients. where parents who buy a ticket for their children and give them as opresent, when they're going 18, and there are some twiert people. >> sxc has signed up 250 customers globally, about half of that are virgin, richard branson's company, and opened up an office in asia in the hope attracting china's wealthy. >> we expect to sell 50 to 80 tickets in asia for the first year. and after the first depart we are certain it will be triple from what we're talking about. >> sxc offers what it cl
access to those sites, they have at their disposal technology that will make their mission relative simple. they spoke to al jazeera about exactly what is involved. >> the u.n. weapons inspectors will have sophisticated equipment with them and simpler equipment, the sort of stuff that we have here. first of all, i suspect most of the inspectors got this clipped to their belt which will identify if there is an agent, a nerve agent. it will tell you if it's sarin or others and will test for mustard gas. it seems that the most logical explanation was that a nerve agent was used and probably sarin. we have a very simple device here that works with antibodies, and will identify up to eight toxins or pathogens like anthrax, ricin, and this is a quick test that could be done in the area. you'll get an answer in a few minutes. we start off with an one size fits off respirator that can be put on in a few seconds. this will give you comprehensive protection against even the strongest chemical weapons for some period. i think allied with that is basic advise, ideally you should move upward bec
costs and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow. and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision in the voting rights act because, look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirmed and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [ applause ] but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates. and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never
in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learn about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours, and voted anyway, so obviously we don't need any kind of law. but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gate
of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class. reduced the bargaining power of american workers. our politics has suffered. entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it to fund crumbbling schools, that all these things violated sound economic principles. we would be told that growing inequality was a price for a growing economy. a measure of the free market. that greed was good and compassion ineffective. those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle class americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame foe their growing economic insecurity, that bureaucrats were taking their hard earn dollars to benefit
ourselves. the task will not be easy. since 1963 the economy's changed. the twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class, reduced the bargaining power of american workers. and our politics has suffered. entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists to argue that stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it just to fund crumbling schools, that all these things violated sound economic principles. we'd be told that growing inequality was a price for a growing economy. a measure of the free market. that greed was good and compassion ineffective. and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle-class americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity. that
about media, technology companies. we have a massive problem. until we have jobs and freedom economic prosperity, we will continue to suffer in that regard. >> yet, what we have and this is where we can look back on this 50th anniversary how is it relevant today and the future? we can vote. we can vote with our pocketbooks and remote control. if there isn't a justice we perceive as far as not having enough adversity of our culture, we can speak and we can speak very loudly. >> one unifying color is green, right? >> yes. >> there is truth to that. >> michelle spos to that. >> you do see -- that's right. but you do see viviana, look at why things are moving faster to reaching out to hispanics. gee, there is a dollar attached to appealing to hispanics. >> absolutely. it's really interesting because in this sense, i think the business community and even the media community has been the leadership has been incredibly savvy and they realize this community is topping 1 trillion in buying power and the focus is on the women because we control the buying decisions and influence our kids. that
with technology innovation to help lower costs, so he's coming here to spotlight the kinds of things he's talking about in terms of how colleges can lower their costs and yet still maintain a good education. so he'll start here and then he'll go to a high school in syracuse where he'll also talk to students who are about to enter college and their parents who are about to pay for it. this is all part of a larger strategy based on what he calls his middle class program, and over the past several weeks he's given several speeches on different aspects of this program. he talked about jobs in one city, infrastructure in another city, housing in yet another city. he says it's education that he says is the key to the middle class. we're a knowledge many economy. if you're a college graduate, you've got a better chance of entering that knowledge economy and making more of an income. and on top of that, you know, basically he was on vacation last week, now he's getting back to the real grind, and we're heading into september where we're going to be looking at a lot of budget fights. the fiscal year ends
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine... but why you would want it is not. the 2014 e-class, see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. diarrhea, gas, bloating? yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. live the regular life. phillips'. newspaper reporter in fort worth when martin luther king jr. spoke that day. i watched it all on television with wonder and relief-- wonder at the power of his words, relief that it had all gone so peacefully. by then, i considered myself an enlightened person on race, but i had grown up in jim crowe texas where whites and blacks lived in worlds separate in ways large and small. i never shook hands with a black person until i was in the air force-- not that i didn't want to. i just never had the occasion. they lived on one side of town. i lived on the other. schools were still mostly segregated, and the newspaper where i worked generally ignored news about black people.
success of that march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly, almost every technological change since then from satellite television to arena video screens and sound systems have made marches more accessible, just more feasible. you see the cascading number of marches to the point where the noted martin luther king the type hass, been debased by repetition. asx significant difference we have listened to a number of oral histories, the organizational work it took to put this work together with more than 200,000 in the sum estimated 250,000, well before e-mail and twitter and other social media, this is truly a grassroots effort. a lot has changed in terms of ideology 50 years later. has that impacted the value of these marches? klux guest: carried topeech was nations around the world by satellite, and broadcast live on the only three broadcast networks, today, it would take in a norma's event to get that kind of attention. get thatus event to kind of attention. people's attention span for various reasons has been so changed, that you really have to fight to break through t
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support for a possible military strike. meanwhile, a united nations team began wrapping up its own efforts to find out just what happened last week, in a suburb of the syrian capital. outside damascus, u.n. inspectors made a third trip to the site of an alleged chemical weapons attack. collecting samples in gas masks and protective gear, while the u.n. secretary general, ban ki- moon, said their mission is nearly over. he spoke in vienna. >> they will continue investigation activities until tomorrow, friday and will come out of syria by saturday morning, and will report to me as soon as they come out of syria. >> brown: the inspect
in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, for non-death -- fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, and vesta and our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. classly, and the second- citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents. ♪ >> our next two speakers, professor charles over tree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia campos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african- american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, darrell par
lead in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, invest in our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. finally, and the second-class citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents. >> our next two speakers, professor charles ogletree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia ampos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african-american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. i want to support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, darrell park
as they have for 300 years, simply, humbly, almost no modern technology. a hit reality show is painting this peaceful christian community as brimming with intrigue and controversy. >> the mafia operates outside of amish law. >> reporter: the amish mafia in its second season airing on the discovery channel follows this man, lebanon levi and assistants who look over the amish community in lancaster county and does the dirty work the church can't. >> levi is a great guy. if you cross him he is not afraid to crack skulls. >> reporter: they take the matters of their own community in their own hands and keep an eye on the teenagers who take time off to experience the outside world before committing their lives to the sect. >> i make sure the peace is being kept and everybody is obeying the rules. [ bleep ]. >> reporter: as a whole, the amish deny the existence of the amish mafia. much of the show's content has been criticized by amish scholars and questions raised if even some of the cast members are actors. the series producers say the cast members aren't actors and haven't been baptized in
in science and technology to train young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climates. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for armies and hispanics and students and elderly and infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [applause] >> but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. [applause] >> we must open those stubborn gates. and let us not forget while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn
a triple because you were born on third base. you are enjoying freedoms, opportunity, technology, things that were given to you bought by the struggles and the sacrifices and the work of those who came before. don't you forget where you come from. you drank deeply from wells of freedom and liberty and opportunity that you did not dig. you eat lavishly from banquet tables, prepared for you by your ancestors. we in my generation cannot now afford to sit back consuming all of our blessings, getting dumb, fat and happy thinking that we have achieved freedom. the truth of the matter is, that the dream still demands that the moral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. we need to understand that there is still work to do. when the leading cause of death for black men my age and younger is gun violence, we still have work to do. when we still have a justice system that treats the economically disadvantaged and minorities different than others, we still have work to do. when you can in america work a full-time job plus over time and still be below the stifling --
investing in science and technology to train young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climates. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for armies and hispanics and students and elderly and infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [applause] >> but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. [applause] we must open those stubborn gates. let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with lost dreams and dashed ,opes of people of all races and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become. if we pushed open those st
were born on third base. enjoying freedom, opportunity, technology, things fought bygiven to you the struggles and the sacrifices those who came before and don't you forget where you have come from. you drank deeply from wells of and om and liberty opportunity that you did tphnot dig. you ate lavishly from tables ancestors.y your we and my generation cannot now consuming allback of our blessings thinking that achieved freedom. the truth of the matter is that still demands that the oral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. understand that there is still work to do. hen the leading cause of death for black men my age and younger is gun violence we still have to do. when we still have a justice treats the economically disadvantaged and minorities different than others have work to do. america work a full-time job plus overtime and stifling line the of poverty, we still have work to do. when we see wages stagnating, when child poverty is the rich are en getting richer and the poor are millions ofer, when our children are living in neighborhoods wher
of interceptors and at this point we don't have the capability to intercept from china but the technology is progressing steadily and slowly so it may be beyond the ten year horizon. what does the dialogue look like and what does that act will dynamic as the numbers and keep the of the interceptors improved and is there a way that we can talk with china to keep the strategic stability without costing them to go higher and more sophisticated in their nuclear capability. >> i hope there is that it seeks to to dialogue and china has a long track record of resisting american and its own leadership in this dialogue area. let me be clear you have a good modifier but almost an arms race or an arms race response recall ten years ago rumsfeld articulated a concern defending the number of nuclear weapons under the moscow treaty, the strategic treaty defending that right number in part because it dealt with a potential sprint to parity by china. ten years later there was no sprint or parity so we need to be careful as we characterize what china is up to. in my assessment china is modernizing and div
not gather in the hotel in washington d.c. who did not have the technology or the tools that we had our who could that imagine having a black president or black attorney general. they did not turn back and we cannot either. we are so blessed because god is on our side. we're so blessed to be here together. we're so blessed to have leadership together we will keep moving forward when it comes to fight for justice. we cannot and we will not, we shall not be moved in our struggles that it is a reality. thank you so much. [applause] >> i told you. [laughter] >> when she was walking down the steps she said that was my low voice. [laughter] it is always a pleasure to hear her speak. but you will recognize the name and maybe the face with the work they she does she is the head of the largest national civil-rights in the u.s. ahead of national council and what she did was along with their partners they worked a and registered for that election, as some two to thousand new hispanic voters so please give a warm welcome. [applause] >> hello. thank you all and i especially want to think there durbin be
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)